Penance and Reconciliation

Penance and Reconciliation

…at St. Margaret Mary

St. Margaret Mary parish offers daily opportunities to receive the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation.

“Those who approach the sacrament of Penance obtain pardon from God’s mercy for the offense committed against him, and are, at the same time, reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by their sins and which by charity, by example, and by prayer labors for their conversion. (LG 11)

It is called the sacrament of conversion because it makes sacramentally present Jesus’ call to conversion, the first step in returning to the Father (Mk 1:15) from whom one has strayed by sin. It is called the sacrament of Penance, since it consecrates the Christian sinner’s personal and ecclesial steps of conversion, penance, and satisfaction. [CCC 1423] It is called the sacrament of confession, since the disclosure or confession of sins to a priest is an essential element of this sacrament. In a profound sense it is also a “confession” – acknowledgment and praise – of the holiness of God and of his mercy toward sinful man. It is called the sacrament of forgiveness, since by the priest’s sacramental absolution God grants the penitent “pardon and peace.” It is called the sacrament of Reconciliation, because it imparts to the sinner the live of God who reconciles: “Be reconciled to God.” (2Cor 5:20)  He who lives by God’s merciful love is ready to respond to the Lord’s call: “Go; first be reconciled to your brother.” (Mt 5:24) [CCC 1424]

“Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, ‘Peace be with you.’ When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. The disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, ‘Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.’ And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, ‘Receive the holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.'” (Jn 20:19-23)

Jesus now entrusts the power to forgive sins to his priests. It is the power which every priest exercises when he raises his hand over the contrite sinner and says, “I absolve you from your sins in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.” These are called “the words of absolution.”

All the benefits of the sacrament of Reconciliation—restoration or increase of sanctifying grace, forgiveness of sins, remission of punishment, restoration of merit, grace to conquer temptation—all these are possible only because of the infinite merits of Jesus Christ, which the sacrament of Reconciliation applies to our souls.

CLICK BELOW for additional information and resources from the Archdiocese of Omaha

Making a Good Confession

Frequently Asked Questions

Videos

These videos (filmed at St. Margaret Mary) on confession, reconciliation, and penance feature Archbishop George Lucas and members of the lay faithful. We hope they help you appreciate the beauty of the sacrament and encourage you to receive God’s grace through it.

May 23, 2017 | Share this on: